Archive for the ‘USA Today’ Category

USAT: Top design and photo editor Curtis retiring

December 11, 2008

(Updated.) Managing Editor Richard Curtis, who oversees photography and design at Gannett’s flagship newspaper, has just told colleagues that he’s retiring, effective Dec. 23. One of six MEs, Curtis has been with the paper since January 1982, nine months before its launch. News of his retirement comes as USA Today‘s newsroom staff was said to be meeting today. I’m looking for a final count of jobs cut across the paper — details like this comment by Anonymous@4:10 p.m.

Detroit to address reports of ‘significant changes’ Big print, circ shift rumored | Stock plunges 12%

December 11, 2008

Gannett’s Detroit operations early next week will address newly published accounts of a secret project, designed to save the city’s two struggling newspapers. Speculation is focused on a rumored plan to end home delivery of the Detroit Free Press and The Detroit News for all but two or three days a week.

This would make the 300,000-circulation Free Press and the 177,000 News by far the biggest U.S. papers yet to drop, or effectively drop, a day’s publication, Editor & Publisher is now reporting. Such a switch, I wrote this morning, would represent an enormous gamble by Gannett and its partner, MediaNews Group, to stanch multimillion-dollar losses in a city whose economy is cratering around the auto industry crisis. Hanging in the balance are the jobs of perhaps 2,000 employees.

Wall Street investors weren’t happy: Gannett’s stock plunged 11.9% this afternoon, closing at $7.59 a share, down $1.02. Meanwhile, the widely watched S&P-500 index fell a smaller 2.9%.

Hunke: ‘Reposition’ for growth
In a memo regarding a plan reportedly named “Project Griffon,” CEO Dave Hunke said the Detroit Media Partnership has been “exploring various scenarios” to “ensure two strong newspaper voices in the community.” Gannett has controlled 95% of the partnership through a joint operating agreement, reorganized in 2005.

Hunke’s memo: “In the past 24 hours you have no doubt heard a lot of rumors and several news reports about significant changes at the Detroit Free Press and The Detroit News. Clearly, over the past months we have been exploring various scenarios to reposition the companies for growth and to ensure two strong newspaper voices in the community. We plan to share details early next week with you, as well as with readers, advertisers, unions and the community. In the meantime, let’s continue to focus on doing the best job we can and on building the strongest relationships we can among ourselves and with our customers.”

Tuesday announcement?
Hunke’s memo follows my post this morning, speculating that an announcement on Project Griffon could come as early as Tuesday. Looks like this story has legs after all.

A tipster says the vice president of circulation also advised employees: “Just wanted to remind everyone that all inquiries from media should be directed to Susie Ellwoods office.” (Gannettland is an even smaller world than I thought: Ellwood and I worked together at The Arkansas Gazette in the late 1980s, when Craig Moon — now USA Today publisher — was the Little Rock paper’s chief executive. Of course, back then, she had a different surname.)

Earlier: Motown, Project Griffon — and that secret PM code

Please post your replies in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: this morning’s Freep and News, Newseum]

Toll punches through 1,900; big dailies still missing

December 7, 2008

Gannett has eliminated 1,904 newspaper jobs in a mass layoff that moved into high gear last week, a new Gannett Blog survey today shows, as employees who survived the cuts now look ahead nervously to vastly changed working conditions.

At the urging of readers, I’ve added positions lost from separately announced press shutdowns in Asheville, N.C., and Clarksville, Tenn. (left). Our survey now includes 67 of 85 newspapers in this layoff round.

Still, papers that are missing or have incomplete figures include three of the company’s biggest individual employers: USA Today, the Detroit Free Press, and The Cincinnati Enquirer. Combined, those papers plus other worksites with missing figures employ as many as 5,500 of Gannett’s approximately 30,000 newspaper employees.

Gannett has estimated it will have cut about 2,000 jobs at the mostly small papers in its community newspaper division, once this layoff round is done. That estimate would cover Cincinnati — but not USAT or Detroit, because they’re managed in a division of their own, subject to separate budget-cutting goals.

Survivor: ‘No cavalry is coming’
Whatever the final tally, employees who escaped layoff now face a new reality. “Those left behind — at medium and small properties, anyway — are going to be crushed by the additional workload,” Anonymous@12:20 p.m. wrote today in a new comment. “I already put 10 additional hours in this week (exempt; no OT, of course), and that was nothing, because the hard workers who were laid off had worked ahead as always. . . . This week, we will begin to feel the real loss, as it is all on us and no cavalry is coming.”

There’s more: “I am not looking for sympathy. I know I am extremely lucky to still have a paycheck, and I know any number of unemployed journos out there would change places w/me in heartbeat. I am just saying that being a survivor is going to be very rough indeed, and I don’t believe we will stay on this melting iceberg very long.”

We’re tallying job cuts, paper-by-paper. Is yours included? Please post figures on our list, or in the comments section, below. You may also e-mail confidentially via gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com].

[Image: today’s Leaf-Chronicle front page in Clarksville, Newseum]

USAT: Nearly half this year’s hires were minorities

December 6, 2008

(Updated.) The company’s flagship newspaper disclosed that figure as one of the most powerful minority journalism trade groups challenged Gannett to “review its diversity numbers,” once this week’s 2,000 newspaper job cuts are complete.

“We’ve actually been able to step up our commitment to diversity,” Brent Jones, USA Today‘s standards and recruitment editor, told the Maynard Institute’s Journal-isms blog. “We’ve had great success in recruiting in 2008, particularly at Unity. In fact, 48% of our hires this year were journalists of color.”

The Maynard Institute promotes diversity in media. Jones told blog author Richard Prince that, of 12 USA Today newsroom jobs cut this week, “two — or 16% of the cuts — were of minority journalists. That included one African American and one Asian American.” He did not identify them by name, Prince said.

Jones provided the figures as the National Association of Black Journalists issued its high-profile challenge Friday to the newspaper industry, Prince told me this afternoon. (When I first read his post, I thought Prince had called Jones after the NABJ issued its statement.)

NABJ singled out just one publisher: Gannett. The group, which claims 3,300 members, is the largest of four minority journalism professional associations. The other three are the Asian American Journalists Association, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and the Native American Journalists Association.

Gannett, the nation’s No. 1 newspaper publisher, has been a major financial backer of the four groups through direct grants from its charitable arm, the Gannett Foundation.

Did USAT newsroom avoid layoffs?
In what I believe is the paper’s first official acknowledgement of how it reduced its workforce, Prince quotes Jones as saying in an e-mail: “A total of 12 journalists were laid off, including four voluntary layoffs.” Previously, USA Today had said it would cut 20 occupied jobs from its 450-person newsroom, because of Corporate pressure.

Jones’ statement suggests the paper avoided eight forced cuts. But he may only be counting reporters and editors as “journalists.” I know of at least one newsroom layoff involving a bureau office manager who didn’t produce content for the paper or website.

Whatever last week’s newsroom tally, USAT has yet to disclose the total number of jobs it cut across the paper amid Gannett’s nationwide 10% newspaper workforce reduction. USA Today employs between 1,500 and 2,000, making it one of the company’s three biggest worksites. The other two are The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, and the Detroit Free Press and its business affiliates.

Please post your replies in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: Thursday’s USAT front page; I would have illustrated this post with Friday’s paper, but that edition isn’t in the Newseum‘s database]

CJR: Phoenix, USAT deny pre-pub review claim

December 5, 2008

Taser International asserts Gannett’s two biggest newspapers agreed to show the controversial stun-gun maker any stories they wrote before publication, as part of a lawsuit settlement — claims they deny, Columbia Journalism Review reports today. The papers are USA Today and The Arizona Republic.

Taser made the claims in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing that CJR says amount to false statements. The trade publication’s account is a fascinating inside glimpse at the machinations of lawsuits against newspapers — and the settlements that sometimes follows.

[Photo: the X26 model stun gun, Taser International]

USA Today: Add up to seven more jobs eliminated

December 5, 2008

These seven are at the newspaper’s USA Weekend magazine, the Sunday-only insert, readers say in an e-mail and in this comment. The positions eliminated would be on top of the 20 job cuts already planned for USA Today‘s newsrooms. With 1,500 to 2,000 workers, USAT must have shed even more jobs, as the paper joins the rest of Gannett in trimming operations.

USAT staff: How many jobs have been eliminated in total? Please add your numbers to our paper-by-paper tally, or in the comments section, below. You may also e-mail confidentially via gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com].

[Image: the current issue features singer Beyonce on the cover]

If Scripps loses $15M, what is GCI’s hit in Detroit?

December 4, 2008

Maybe this is why I feel like something big is going on in ominously-quiet Detroit:

To start, surely you saw that E.W. Scripps expects to lose $15 million on the Rocky Mountain News this year, prompting the publisher to put the paper on the auction block today. If that’s the toll in Denver, how much is the Detroit Media Partnership losing on the Detroit Free Press and the other daily in that joint operating agency, The Detroit News? Remember, the Freep was already bleeding a year ago, well before the credit crisis engulfed the U.S. auto industry — right there in the Freep‘s back yard. Detroit’s economy has got to be in worse shape than Denver’s.

Gannett has controlled the Detroit JOA since buying the Freep in 2005 from Knight Ridder, then selling the News to MediaNews Group. In Denver, MediaNews owns the Post, which is in a JOA with the Rocky. Blogger Alan Mutter wrote today that MediaNews is the most likely buyer for the Rocky, which would probably then be shut down — giving MediaNews sole control of the Denver market. Is anything like that afoot in Detroit?

Waiting for Detroit’s plan
With Corporate now on a rampage to cut costs anywhere, the Freep and the JOA would be expected to report job reductions in the current layoff, even after buying out 116 employees in July. But we’ve heard nothing yet from Detroit Media Partnership CEO David Hunke, who also is Freep publisher. Ditto for Hunke’s boss, USA Today Publisher Craig Moon.

Then a reader pointed me to yesterday’s alternative Metro Times, where columnist Jack Lessenberry notes “persistent rumors have been circulating that the Detroit Free Press was on the verge of publishing mainly on the Internet.” And then there was this curious comment, by Anonymous@7:53 p.m. . . .

Earlier: Documents reveal double-digit profit margins at scores of papers now on verge of massive layoffs.

Please post your replies in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: yesterday’s front page, Newseum]

Connell to E&P: Cuts will wipe out 2,000 jobs

December 4, 2008

Gannett now expects to eliminate about 2,000 jobs in the community newspaper division alone, says a new Editor & Publisher story that suggests the final tally may be higher, once two of the biggest sites outside the division — USA Today and Detroit — reveal their plans.

The trade publication quotes spokeswoman Tara Connell, who rarely communicates with Gannett Blog. Previously, Connell had said only that the number of jobs cut would be “significantly less” than 3,000. Corporate had set a goal of reducing employment 10% in the 30,000-employee community newspaper division. Late this morning, the number of jobs eliminated had already reached nearly 1,800 at 65 of 85 papers, according to a running tally by Gannett Blog readers.

Until now, Corporate did not know how many jobs were being eliminated, Connell says, because individual papers decided which cuts to make. “We said that it was going to be locally decided and locally managed and that is exactly what happened,” Connell told E&P.

Wiggle room alert
Connell’s 2,000-job estimate doesn’t include USA Today or the mysteriously quiet Detroit Free Press. Combined, the two employ 3,500 to 4,000, and are managed outside the community newspaper division. The Freep and the Gannett-controlled Detroit Media Partnership joint operating agency have not revealed any layoff plans. USAT has said only that it expects to eliminate 20 newsroom jobs; many more cuts are likely from other departments. Stay tuned.

Connell told E&P that all of the cuts are keeping with the company’s mandate to keep expenses tied to revenue: “Hopefully,” she said, “we will not have to do anymore (daily newspaper) layoffs, but it has to be kept in line with revenue.” She also said other divisions outside of the community newspaper division are likely to be affected as well: “There have been and will continue to be layoffs throughout the company.”

Please post your replies in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: today’s front page, Newseum]

As layoffs near, charity that doesn’t begin at home: Foundation pours more cash into execs’ pet causes

November 30, 2008

Gannett is about to launch one of the industry’s single-biggest newspaper layoffs, so I figured it was time to update my reporting on Gannett Foundation gifts to charities favored by company executives. (Who knows? Maybe we can save some jobs if someone in charge realizes there are other ways to economize.) The following is based on the foundation’s just-filed 2007 tax return, which I received Friday under the federal Freedom of Information Act.

As CEO Craig Dubow (left) imposed draconian budget cuts last year, the company’s charitable arm — the Gannett Foundation — made an unusual gift: $20,000 for scholarships at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, N.C. It was one of the foundation’s single-biggest direct grants of 2007, and followed an identical $20,000 gift the year before, public documents show.

The gifts were unusual for several reasons. The Gannett foundation’s website says it won’t give money to endowment funds; the two grants were for an “endowed scholarship,” the foundation’s tax returns shows. Also, the foundation’s stated mission is to help non-profit groups where Gannett owns a newspaper or TV station. The closest GCI business is 53 miles away: the Citizen-Times in Asheville, N.C.

But Western Carolina had a powerful ally: Dubow himself. He is the foundation’s chairman and president, and one of its seven unpaid officers, all Gannett employees. As Gannett’s CEO, Dubow is among a handful of current and former executives allowed to steer foundation money to favorite charities — often, charities including religious groups that would be ineligible under rules applying to regular employees and the public.

Sure enough, Dubow recommended both $20,000 gifts, the foundation’s new tax return shows. Last year’s grant was among $320,000 awarded to charities recommended by Dubow and 15 current and former executives — including some of the highest-paid brass, an analysis of the tax return shows. The 2007 grants were on top of $724,000 the foundation gave in 2004-2006 to charities favored by executives.

Unseemly ‘philanthropy’
There is nothing illegal about any of this. The grants were made under a little-known perquisite that Gannett says is meant to attract and retain top executives. Under the benefit, the foundation imposes fewer restrictions on donation requests from top management compared to requests from average employees and the public. For example, these direct grants didn’t require any matching money from the executives — unlike a similar program for regular employees, GannettMatch.

Based on last year’s giving, each executive got $20,000 in what amounts to play philanthropy money. All of it appears to have gone to non-profit groups. I suspect many other big companies offer a similar benefit to top executives. Plus, the $320,000 last year was just a fraction of the overall $11.3 million in grants approved.

Yet, with a mass layoff coming this week at papers including Florida’s News-Press in Fort Myers, spending on executives’ pet charities is at sharp odds with Dubow’s claims of fiscal discipline and shared sacrifice.

Besides, there’s something unseemly about sending foundation money to charities far from Gannett communities — at the same time GCI is reducing employment and news coverage in those same places. Why didn’t these 16 executives give their $320,000 in earmarked grants to the company’s Employee Disaster Relief Fund?

It’s not even clear whether Gannett is getting credit for all its gifts. Consider the $40,000 to Western Carolina University. The tax return says the money went to an “endowed scholarship,” rather than to, say, a general-use scholarship fund. Scholarship funds typically offer naming rights.

I asked foundation Executive Director Tara Connell which fund received the money. I asked WCU, too. I look forward to their replies. (Connell is also Gannett’s spokeswoman. Read her objections to my last report.)

The Dubow scholarship fund?
Meanwhile, I searched WCU’s website, but turned up just one reference to the Gannett Foundation, a $3,270 grant to a theater group in early 2003. Then I found a page showing a “complete listing of WCU scholarships.” But Gannett and the Gannett Foundation do not appear anywhere on the page. There is, however, a scholarship listed under the names of Dubow and his wife:

“Craig and Denise Dubow have established an endowed fund to provide scholarship support for deserving students at Western Carolina University. This scholarship provides support for full time undergraduate students from Jackson, Macon, and Transylvania counties who demonstrate financial need and maintain a B average.”

More than likely, this amounts to an out-of-date list on a website or some other innocent omission. The Dubows probably established and funded the scholarships on their own, using their own money. In fact, the return’s GannettMatch section shows the foundation matched an unidentified employee’s $10,000 gift; that could have been from Dubow, ponying up for his own fund.

But until I hear back from Connell and WCU, I still don’t know how the Gannett Foundation received credit for its $40,000 in direct grants. There’s reason to be curious: Last spring, I found at least two examples where foundation money went to other scholarship funds named after executives — rather than Gannett or the foundation. (Updated at 10:41 a.m. ET, Dec. 1: A WCU spokesman has now referred my questions to the the school’s fund-raising office.)

More liberal rules
The direct grants to endowed scholarship funds at WCU and elsewhere are made possible because of the more liberal foundation rules for the executives. For anyone else seeking support for their scholarship fund, the foundation’s website says: “The only scholarship program currently funded by the foundation is the Madelyn P. Jennings Scholarship Program for children of Gannett employees.”

Gannett provides all the foundation’s funds. Periodically, it donates a newspaper to the foundation, which then sells it, and reinvests the proceeds in stocks and other investments. That’s what happened to the Chronicle-Tribune in Marion, Ind., which Gannett sold last year via the foundation for $12.3 million. It had been a Gannett paper for 36 years.

More executive-directed gifts
Other noteworthy Gannett Foundation direct grants given last year on the recommendation of current or former executives. Each person directed a total $20,000 to charities of their own choosing.

Earlier: How to examine a non-profit’s tax returns

Please post your replies in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: today’s News-Press, Newseum. The paper is expected to lay off up to 80 of 600 employees in the next week]

Documents reveal double-digit profit margins at scores of papers now on verge of massive layoffs

November 28, 2008

We’ve always heard that Gannett newspapers racked up double-digit profit margins, even as bad times engulfed the industry. But I’ve never seen actual numbers until now, because Corporate keeps the performance of individual businesses a well-guarded secret.

I’ve recently had an opportunity to review margins for most of GCI’s U.S. newspapers as of a year ago (USA Today isn’t included). They’re disclosed in an internal report, the Cost & Statistical Summary, provided to me by a Gannett Blog reader; it covers the first three quarters (periods 1-9) of 2007. The reader asked to remain anonymous, citing possible repercussions if identified. The reader did not have more current data, for 2008. And the reader requested I not share copies of the report with anyone.

Green Bay: No. 1 at 42.5%
The numbers are startling — especially now, with Gannett poised to lay off perhaps thousands of newspaper workers next week in another bid to boost the company’s flagging stock. Every newspaper except Detroit’s was profitable a year ago — although some, just barely so.

The Green Bay Press-Gazette was the star. It had the single-highest profit margin: 42.5%. In other words, Green Bay kept 43 cents of every dollar it took in. The paper’s total ad revenue over the three quarters: $25 million. The report doesn’t disclose circulation revenue for any paper. Applied only to ad revenue, then, Green Bay made around $10.6 million during the period. (Will Green Bay lay off workers next week? We’ll find out.)

Now, some readers say these are, in fact, gross profit margins — that certain costs must still be subtracted before you can get to “net” earnings. That may be true, but the reports I’ve got just say “newspaper profit margin.” (See a screenshot of one report.)

The money-losing Detroit Free Press and the formerly Gannett-owned Detroit News are published by the GCI-controlled joint operating agency there. To be sure, several barely profitable papers may have dipped into the red since this report was published. The economy went over a cliff this year when the housing bubble collapsed, throwing the nation into recession. Yet, I imagine many of the papers listed below are still enjoying very healthy margins.

The Arizona Republic vies with USA Today as the company’s biggest revenue generator. (Since USAT isn’t included in these reports, the exact rankings remain unknown.) The Republic‘s margin was a solid 25.43%, on $319 million in total ad revenue during the three quarters.

Paper-by-paper: Margins, ad sales
Following is the performance of more than 80 U.S. newspapers over the first three quarters of last year, ending about Sept. 30. Gannett’s 17-daily U.K. Newsquest chain and the TV division aren’t included. Total ad sales are provided, but not circulation revenue. (However, circulation is a fraction of the newspaper division’s revenue: just 21% so far this year, says the third-quarter earnings report.)

Note that many newspapers are tiny revenue-generators. Also, names below are those listed in the report; some Wisconsin and Ohio papers are grouped together. To get a sense of an individual paper’s profit in dollars, multiply the margin against ad sales.

  • Alexandria, La.: 20.56% margin; $9.7 million in ad sales
  • Appleton, Wisc.: 32.47%; $22.2
  • Asbury Park, N.J.: 19.16%; $82.3
  • Asheville, N.C.: 23.49%; $20.6
  • Battle Creek, Mich.: 13.05%; $6.7
  • Binghamton, N.Y.: 32.64%; $18.1
  • Brevard, Fla.: 24.68%; $44.8
  • Bridgewater, N.J.: 10.04%; $13.3
  • Bucyrus, Ohio: 9.59%; $1.0
  • Burlington, Vt.: 36.21%; $21.3
  • Central Wisconsin: 24.25%; $16.2
  • Cherry Hill, N.J.: 9.83%; $40.7
  • Chillicothe, Ohio: 22.3%; $3.4
  • Cincinnati: 13.97%; $111.9
  • Clarksville, Tenn.: 26.01%; $8.9
  • Coshocton, Ohio: 4.67%; $0.9
  • Des Moines: 24.58%; $71.0
  • Detroit: negative 4.96%; $164.8
  • East Brunswick, N.J.: 16.07%; $19.6
  • East Wisconsin: 29.75%; $77.8
  • Elmira, N.Y.: 19.2%; $9.0
  • Fond du Lac, Wisc.: 8.02%; $3.0
  • Fort Collins, Colo.: 30.97%; $16.2
  • Fort Myers, Fla.: 29.99%; $66.3
  • Freemont, Ohio: 11.89%; $2.6
  • Great Falls, Mont.: 21.18%; $9.2
  • Green Bay, Wisc.: 42.5%; $25.0
  • Greenville, S.C.: 27.29%; $45.3
  • Guam: 40.39%; $11.2
  • Hattiesburg, Miss.: 16.44%; $7.3
  • Honolulu: 3.33%; $76.6
  • Indianapolis: 24.97%; $116.3
  • Iowa City, Iowa: 15.17%; $7.0
  • Ithaca, N.Y.: 16.01%; $5.8
  • Jackson, Miss.: 25.94%; $34.5
  • Jackson, Tenn.: 15.14%; $10.2
  • Lafayette, Ind.: 27.85%; $12.2
  • Lafayette, La.: 33.52%; $23.2
  • Lancaster, Ohio: 15.15%; $3.0
  • Lansing, Mich.: 23.22%; $26.7
  • Louisville: 19.33%; $78.5
  • Manitowoc, Wisc.: 21.12%; $4.7
  • Mansfield, Ohio: 31.39%; $8.3
  • Marion, Ohio: 26.04%; $3.0
  • Marshfield, Wisc.: 15.23%; $2.2
  • Monroe, La.: 15.09%; $10.6
  • Montgomery, Ala.: 27.83%; $22.1
  • Morristown, N.J.: 14.93%; $16.4
  • Mountain Home, Ark.: 20.25%; $3.1
  • Muncie, Ind.: 24.0%; $9.5
  • Nashville: 21.38%; $93.1
  • Newark, Ohio: 17.25%; $5.1
  • NNC Ohio: 22.09%; $37.0
  • Opelousas, La.: 33.0%; $2.6
  • Oshkosh, Wisc.: 31.15%; $6.8
  • Palm Springs, Calif.: 37.98%; $40.2
  • Pensacola, Fla.: 27.10%; $28.7
  • Phoenix: 25.43%; $319.2
  • Port Clinton, Ohio: 2.74%; $0.8
  • Port Huron, Mich.: 17.58%; $9.0
  • Poughkeepsie, N.Y.: 27.84%; $20.0
  • Reno: 34.90%; $42.8
  • Richmond, Ind.: 18.17%; $5.2
  • Rochester, N.Y.: 28.48%; $62.3
  • St. Cloud, Minn.: 28.16%; $17.2
  • St. George, Utah: 29.91%; $13.7
  • Salem, Ore.: 32.95%; $23.2
  • Salinas, Calif.: 7.44%; $8.2
  • Salisbury, Md.: 26.74%; $16.8
  • Sheboygan, Wisc.: 24.01%; $6.7
  • Shreveport, La.: 29.22%; $23.9
  • Sioux Falls, S.D.: 36.55%; $23.7
  • Springfield, Mo.: 37.50%; $28.8
  • Staunton, Va.: 25.56%; $5.4
  • Stevens Point, Wisc.: 19.81%; $2.4
  • Tallahassee: 25.55%; $24.3
  • Tucson-TNI: 28.26%; $67.7
  • Tulare, Calif.: 39.93%; $2.4
  • Vineland, N.J.: 19.15%; $7.1
  • Visalia, Calif.: 22.87%; $9.2
  • Wausau, Wis.: 32.11%; $8.7
  • Westchester, N.Y.: 14.84%; $79.1
  • Wilmington, Del.: 25.08%; $54.7
  • Wisconsin RAPI: 19.92%; $2.3
  • Zanesville, Ohio: 23.08% margin; $4.0 million in ad sales

Earlier: We’re building a paper-by-paper list of layoffs; just three papers are listed so far. Will yours be included when publishers disclose cuts next week?

Please post your thoughts in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.