Archive for the ‘Traffic reports’ Category

Traffic and comments set one-day records

December 4, 2008

Yesterday, more than 17,000 readers ran through 88,000 page views, and posted about 1,100 comments, according to a new Google Analytics report.

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Tuesday traffic: As layoffs grow, readership jumps

December 3, 2008

That’s according to a new Google Analytics report (image, left), which I’m posting because several readers asked about traffic yesterday, the day Gannett launched its big newspaper layoff.

November traffic: It was a month of layoffs, 24/7

December 1, 2008

The three most clicked-on November posts:

Traffic rose from October, too, as these figures show:

[Data and image: Google Analytics]

October blog traffic: Layoff news fuels a rise

October 31, 2008

The three most clicked-on October posts:

  • Losses ‘n’ layoffs: Reeling from a second consecutive quarter of big revenue declines, Gannett announces plans to lay off 10% of its newspaper employees by early December.
  • Job cut warning: CEO Craig Dubow reportedly discloses plans for more layoffs in as little as 10 weeks.
  • My money hunt: Trying to keep Gannett Blog alive past Dec. 31, I launch an experiment nearly guaranteed to fail.

October’s traffic mostly rose from the month before, final Google Analytics data show. Unique visitors (a tricky metric) climbed to 25,750 vs. 24,735 in September. Visits totaled 109,285 vs. 100,538. And page views climbed to about 204,443 from 207,480.

Context: Gannett employs up to 46,000. Plus, top media industry blogger Jim Romenesko nabs 100,000 individual visitors a day.

Makes a perfect holiday gift!
Google Analytics
has the traffic data, available in a free report I make available to anyone, via gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]. See Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: Google Analytics]

Sept. traffic: A decline from last month’s lofty high

October 1, 2008

The three most clicked-on September posts:

  • A re-org meant to cut costs — and speed up change
  • Pay survey: How much does Gannett pay you?
  • Breaking: 100 jobs cut in newspaper division re-org

Traffic fell last month from August’s impossible-to-sustain levels. Unique visitors (why that’s a tricky metric) totaled about 25,000 vs. nearly 29,000 the month before. Visits totaled about 101,000, down from 118,767. And page views fell to 207,480 from a steep 273,112.

And now, context! Gannett employs about 46,000. Plus, media industry-leading blogger Jim Romenesko nabs 100,000 individual visitors a day.

But wait! There’s more!
Google Analytics
has the traffic data, available in a free report I make available to anyone, via gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]. See Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: Google Analytics]

August blog traffic: It’s the end of a newsy summer

August 30, 2008

Amid a surge in readers, the five most clicked-on August posts:

  • Gannett said laying off 600 newspaper employees; pub’s memo discloses total 1,000 jobs getting axed
  • Roll call: Say goodbye to your pink-slipped friends
  • Gannett starts issuing pink slips: 600 jobs at stake; employees tally historic losses; blog updates all day
  • Des Moines: News job cuts, and a ‘have-fun’ e-mail
  • As layoffs begin, spotlight shifts to USA Today

Updated at 5:44 a.m. ET, Sept. 1. News drove traffic sky-high this month — to levels I doubt can be sustained, a new Google Analytics report says. Unique visitors in August jumped 66% from July, to nearly 29,000 (why that metric is tricky). Visits rose 59%, to about 119,000. And page views soared 90%, to about 273,000.

For context: Gannett employs about 46,000. And industry-leading blogger Jim Romenesko nabs 100,000 individual visitors a day.

Free inside!
Google Analytics
has the traffic data, available in a free report I make available to anyone, via gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]. See Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Image: Google Analytics]

Gillin: As Gannett Blog goes ‘viral,’ GCI loses control

August 20, 2008

Paul Gillin, author of Secrets of Social Media Marketing, writes today (second item) on the Newspaper Death Watch blog:

“What do you do when a blogger becomes the chief source of information about what’s going on inside your company for employees of that company? That’s the conundrum that’s facing Gannett these days, as Jim Hopkins independent Gannett Blog has apparently gone viral. Hopkins reveals some recent traffic statistics: 91,000 visits and 189,000 page views in the last 30 days. That’s serious blog traffic, folks. What’s more, the site is being swarmed by Gannett employees. It’s become the virtual watercooler for a company of 46,000 people.

“The conundrum for Gannett is what to do about Hopkins. So far, it’s chosen a strategy of benign neglect, which is a huge mistake. Hopkins remarks that Tara Connell, Gannett’s chief spokesman (and interestingly, a former managing editor at USA Today) has gone almost silent recently as rumors have swirled about layoffs and cutbacks. Meanwhile, check out the volume of comments on each post on the blog. Gannett’s strategy (and we suspect this isn’t Connell’s decision) is about as wrong-headed as it could be. It is allowing a brush fire to grow out of control. What’s worse is that it’s failing to address an important channel to its own employees, who are the most valuable spokespeople it has.

“One of the great ironies of watching the newspaper industry collapse has been to see the same media icons that have long scolded institutions for their insularity become reclusive and inwardly focused when the spotlight is turned on them. Gannet Blog is exhibit A in how not to handle a new influencer.”

Thanks, Paul!

Please post your replies in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

Reader: How was Friday’s Gannett Blog traffic?

August 16, 2008

[30 days’ clicks: yellow bars show visits; red are page views]

Regarding an Indianapolis conference where my blog will be discussed today, a reader says: “How’s the vacation going? Tell Sparky we’re sorry, but the 18,000 of us reading Gannett Blog need you as well! What does yesterday’s visits and pageview graph look like?”

Answer: Traffic eased a bit from Thursday, when Gannett disclosed massive layoffs in its newspaper division. Still, yesterday’s figures continued to be more than three times above average.

[Image: Site Meter]

Blog conference: Five questions for yours truly

August 15, 2008

One of my favorite bloggers is speaking at the two-day Blog Indiana 2008 conference in Indianapolis today: Ruth Holladay, a former columnist for The Indianapolis Star, will lead a session called, “Taking on the big corporations, blogger-style.”

Ruth plans to talk about her own blog — and about Gannett Blog! Prepping for the 3 p.m. session, she asked me some really good questions. Here they are, with my answers:

1. You mention you know Gannett Corporate knows about your blog and watches it. Can you give me any evidence of this? Have you ever received direct feedback from anyone in Corporate?

All of my official, on-the-record correspondence with Gannett Corporate has been through the company’s chief spokeswoman, Tara Connell. You can see our last exchange here. The most direct feedback I’ve received from Connell was in the form of her objections to the first of a series of posts about the Gannett Foundation.

2. Why did you decide to write a blog exclusively about Gannett (well, with asides for wonderful tidbits about Spain and Sparky).

I have been a business reporter for most of the 22 years I’ve been a journalist — 20 of them with Gannett. In October 2006, I noticed two things. One, very few news outlets covered Gannett, even though it’s the biggest newspaper publisher, and one of the nation’s largest private employers (approximately 46,000 workers.) Second, there wasn’t a single blog about Gannett, even though it was about to undergo big changes as it dealt with more competition from the Internet and other venues.

I outlined my principal motivation for starting Gannett Blog on Jan. 11, 2008 — my first day as a former employee, and the date I added my name and photo to the blog for the first time. (Until then, I’d been anonymous.) In that lengthy post, I wrote about my experience as business news editor at the now-shuttered Arkansas Gazette in Little Rock, Ark. Gannett owned the newspaper from 1986-91. From that post:

“Rumors flew that Gannett was planning to sell us to the competition, or dump us into a joint-operating agreement. More than 700 employee families were desperate for information. As the paper’s business news editor, I managed some of the newsroom staffers reporting on the Gazette‘s demise. We called Gannett’s Corporate office, pleading for information, over and over. And again and again, we got this: No comment.

“Today, much of Gannett is experiencing the uncertainty we saw in Arkansas in the summer of 1991. But now, technology empowers the company’s nearly 50,000 employees to communicate in ways not possible 16 years ago. Start more blogs: I’d like to build a companywide network!”
Bottom line: I started Gannett Blog so employees would have a safe place to share information about the company, without fear of reprisal from management, as they prepared themselves for a vastly changed industry.
3. Do you see your blog as having a shelf life with an expiration date, or do you see it going on as long as there are news corporations? To put it another way, if Gannett breaks up, will you still write about the biz?

I’ve written that I only plan to keep Gannett Blog about two or three years — as long as the company remains substantially in its current form. That said, year No. 3 would start this coming October. If Gannett is dramatically re-shaped, I will stop blogging about the company.

4. How do you address the issue of disloyalty — or do you? You took their check, and I am sure were a great employee. Now you’re a fill-in-the-blank backstabber (I get “bitter” a lot). Or does any of this apply? Are YOU bitter? Or is this just fun?

I’ve never addressed the notion of disloyalty because it’s never been an issue for me. I neither hate nor love Gannett. I do, however, care deeply for its front-line, hourly employees, many of whom are also small stockholders.

5. What is your readership/impact?

In July, the most recent period for which I’ve reported traffic statistics, I had about 17,500 unique visitors; approximately 75,000 visits, and about 144,000 pageviews. That is according to Google Analytics, an online software program that measures such figures.

Please post your replies in the comments section, below. To e-mail confidentially, write gannettblog[at]gmail[dot-com]; see Tipsters Anonymous Policy in the green sidebar, upper right.

[Images: yesterday’s Star, Newseum; my Gazette employee ID, October 1987; I was 30 years old]

Frankly speaking: Blog traffic soars to record highs

August 15, 2008

[Daily clicks: yellow bars show visits; red are page views]

Company co-founder Frank Gannett (left) would not be amused! Gannett Blog grabbed nearly 9,000 visits and 25,000 page views yesterday — more than three times’ the daily average — as the company hacked off 1,000 jobs from the newspaper division. New to this blog? Please take the “Where do you work survey,” near the top of the blue sidebar, right.

[Image: Site Meter]