Chatter: Drinking over falling stock; a clueless pub

An occasional peek at what you’ve been chattering about over the past 24 hours. Latest: Wining and whining about GCI’s tumbling stock. A Luddite for a publisher. And USA Today‘s new cover price hike.

Anonymous@11:55 a.m. said: “At $12 a share, Gannett stock is worth less than a decent bottle of wine. I don’t know if there’s a connection between the two, but somehow I’m sure I would rather spend my money on the wine than the stock. At least I know I would feel better after I downed the bottle. So everyone cash in your stock and go get drunk!”

Sounds like @12:56 a.m. and their co-workers could use a drink: “The people in charge at my paper barely understand how the Internet operates — even our own site. Our publisher was surprised to find out that actual people updated our front-page carousel; he thought it somehow happened automatically, like magic. Sadly, he thinks the same about how the paper comes together.”

On speculation USA Today may retire some vending machines as part of a newly confirmed price hike, @11:10 a.m. wrote: “Street boxes may be expensive and difficult, but they do work at bringing in circulation. And it is circulation that advertisers look at when they decide whether or not to buy ads. I know there is a trend in corporate offices to cut off expensive-to-service circulation, but the downside is that it starts the death spiral and is nothing but brainless cost-cutting. All circulation is costly to maintain and service. It is part of the business.”

Join the debate — or start a new one, in Real Time Comments.

[Image: Wynns Shiraz 2005, $10.99 at Wine.com]

One Response to “Chatter: Drinking over falling stock; a clueless pub”

  1. Anonymous Says:

    Yup. I witnessed that Gannett magical thinking, too, with an EE who seemed to believe all the great story ideas came from press releases. She didn’t have a clue about all the hard work that goes into developing and working a beat.
    I think this kind of cluelessness might be the main reason workers find themsleves working overtime to meet all the unrealistic expectations.

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